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This holiday season,  support the farmers, makers and small businesses in the Adirondacks by shopping for Adirondack-grown and made food and gifts. Share the special sense of place that things made from the sun, soil, and wild rivers of the Adirondacks offer.  There is no better way to express your love and gratitude for our region and the people who make it special than to put your extra holiday spending back into your Adirondack communities. 

The guide below aims to inspire and connect you with farms and small businesses to support this holiday season. Happy Holidays!

Where to Buy Local Food in the Adirondacks in the Winter

Tips for Highlighting Local Seasonal Food

There are many social, environmental, and economic benefits to buying local food that ring especially true during the holidays. Truthfully, it will cost more money.  If you’re used to buying a giant turkey for less than $2 a pound and a box of stuffing mix for $0.99, it may seem like a big stretch to go for $4.00 organic carrots that are only one ingredient in one dish. We get it. But you don’t have to change all of your family traditions at once. If you’re inspired to share these values with your friends and family, introducing a few local ingredients at the holiday table is a great place to start. Do what fits into your budget, progress over perfection. Some tips below to help you along your way.

Plan ahead- You may need to place an order for pick-up or delivery or shop at a retail location up to a week in advance to make sure you have everything you need for your holiday table. Do a little research on what is available near you, make a plan and mark your calendar.

Utilize your nutrition incentive benefits- You can use SNAP, FMNP, e-WIC, Fair Food Pricing and other nutrition incentive programs on local food. Find a full list of places to use them by filtering for your specific benefits here. 

Try to be willing to change plans– Plan for some wiggle room in your menu, not everything you’re looking for may be available. For example, if it’s a bad year for sweet potatoes, try swapping in butternut squash. 

Make a couple of strategic splurges- With smaller guest lists, you may be called to pare your traditional menu down to celebrate what your family really enjoys. Have you always wanted to try a pasture-raised turkey? Go for a smaller, higher-quality bird this year. Do you really love cheese? Splurge on a few really nice locally-made aged cheeses for your charcuterie board and cheesy dishes. Do you have craft beer enthusiasts in your family? Buy a few growlers of locally-brewed beer and offer small glasses so folks can taste a little bit of everything. 

Offer gratitude for the people who provided your food- Take a moment to offer thanks to everyone who brought food to your table. From the farmer who grew the seeds for your veggies, and the people who milked cows in the dark for your cheese, to the folks who stocked the farmstore shelves. 

Grown in the Adirondacks Gift Ideas

Local Wine, Spirits and Craft Beer

A bottle of wine made with Adirondack-grown grapes, spirits made with locally grown corn, and craft beers infused with seasonal flavors always make a great gift

Make a Donation

Make a donation in honor of your loved one to support our work expanding access to local food

CSA Memberships

Sign your loved one up for a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) membership so they can regularly enjoy local, seasonal food

Soaps, Botanicals and Beauty

Handmade soap, moisturizers, and beauty products infused with locally harvested botanicals make touching practical gifts

Would you like to see your business or farm listed in this guide? Learn more about becoming an Adirondack Harvest member here, or contact us at info@adirondackharvest.com for more information. 

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